Journal of Animal and Veterinary Advances

Year: 2008
Volume: 7
Issue: 10
Page No. 1310 - 1315

The Use of Propofol as an Anaesthetic Agent in Dogs with Visceral Leishmaniasis

Authors : Nuh Kilic and Serdar Pasa

Abstract: The objective of this study was to determine the suitability and adverse effects of propofol as an anaesthetic agent in atropine-fentanyl-diazepam premedicated dogs with Visceral Leishmaniasis (VL+) and to compare it with clinically healthy dogs not infected with Visceral Leishmaniasis (VL-). Ten dogs of mixed breed infected by L. infantum (VL+) and a control group of 10 dogs (VL-) of mixed breed were used in this study. Dogs were premedicated with atropine sulphate (0.045 mg kg 1 subcutaneous) fentanyl (0.02 mg kg 1 intravenous) and diazepam (1 mg kg 1 intravenous) followed by induction of anaesthesia with 6 mg kg 1 of propofol IV. Anaesthesia was maintained with propofol (4-5 mg kg 1) as an intermittent bolus administration. Heart rate respiratory rate and rectal temperature were measured before premedication (baseline) and 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 45, 60 after induction and 24 h after anaesthesia. Some biochemical and haemalotogical parameters, were measured before premedication (baseline) and 15, 30, 45, 60 min as well as 24 h after anaesthesia. The total amount of propofol in the VL+ group (18.23.8 mg kg 1) was significantly lower compared to 24.63.4 mg kg 1 in the VL- group (p<0.05). Haemoglobin haematocrit and the number of RBC decreased significantly in both groups at 60 min of anaesthesia (p<0.05 for both groups) and had also returned to baseline 24 h after propofol administration. Propofol seems to be suitable agent for inducing and maintaining a short period of anaesthesia in Leishmania infantum infected dogs premedicated with atropine fentanyl and diazepam. However, haematocrit and haemoglobin concentration should be monitored closely.

How to cite this article:

Nuh Kilic and Serdar Pasa , 2008. The Use of Propofol as an Anaesthetic Agent in Dogs with Visceral Leishmaniasis. Journal of Animal and Veterinary Advances, 7: 1310-1315.

Design and power by Medwell Web Development Team. © Medwell Publishing 2023 All Rights Reserved