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Journal of Animal and Veterinary Advances
Year: 2009 | Volume: 8 | Issue: 7 | Page No.: 1392-1401
Effects of Dietary Protein Sources on the Rumen Microorganisms and Fermentation of Goats
H.R. Wang , M.Z. Wang and L.H. Yu
 
Abstract: The objectives of this study were to investigate how rumen fermentation, microbial community and Microbial Protein (MCP) yields changed with dietary protein. Experiments were conducted using four goats fitted with rumen cannula in a 4x4 Latin square design. Experimental diets were divided into 4 groups according to their nitrogen source, which was feather meal (A), corn gluten meal (B), soybean meal (C) and fish meal (D), respectively. The results showed that the mean pH value of group A and C were high, the reverse was true for group B and D (p<0.05); the change patterns of pH with time differed from each other although, the mean pH value of group A and C (B and D) seemed to be similar. Concentration of NH3-N ranged between 6.77-21.67 mg/100 mL, the lowest average NH3-N concentration (11.08 mg/100 mL) was observed in feather meal supplemental diet (A), while, the highest peak occurred in soybean meal supplemental diet (C) (15.04 mg/100 mL). No significant difference was detected in VFA concentrations among groups, except for valeric acid. Yields of microbial protein also varied with diets; microbial protein of the group C and D were comparatively higher than that of the group A and B (p<0.05); while, bacterial protein yields of group C was significantly higher than that of other 3 groups, protozoa to bacteria ratio was also lowest in group C. Further genetic fingerprint analysis revealed that microbial profile was modified by dietary protein within bacteria or protozoa community. It was concluded that rumen fermentation, microbial profile and rumen microbial protein could be modified properly by dietary protein.
 
How to cite this article:
H.R. Wang , M.Z. Wang and L.H. Yu , 2009. Effects of Dietary Protein Sources on the Rumen Microorganisms and Fermentation of Goats. Journal of Animal and Veterinary Advances, 8: 1392-1401.
URL: http://medwelljournals.com/abstract/?doi=javaa.2009.1392.1401