Journal of Animal and Veterinary Advances

Year: 2011
Volume: 10
Issue: 6
Page No. 723 - 727

Study on Major Reproductive Health Problems in Indigenous and Cross Breed Cows in and Around Bedelle, South West Ethiopia

Authors : Molalegne Bitew and Shiv Prasad

Abstract: Questionnaire survey and regular follow up were conducted to determine the major reproductive health problems of dairy cows in and around Bedelle, South Western Ethiopia from November 2003 to April 2004. From 302 cows which were under investigation 80 (26.5%) had at least one of the reproductive problems. The reproductive problems according to their relative importance in and around Bedelle were Metritis 51 (16.9%), abortion 42 (13.9%), Retained Fetal Membrane (RFM) 26 (8.6%), dystocia 20 (6.6%), repeat breeding 9 (3%), anoestrous 5 (1.7%), prolapse (vaginal and uterine) 3 (1%) and 2 (0.65%), respectively. The prevalence rates of reproductive problems had significant difference (p<0.05) between semi intensive production system (38.8%) and extensive production system (24.4%). Based on breed, the problems were significantly different (p<0.05) in cross breed (43.7%) than indigenous breed (24.5%). Parity and body condition resulted significant difference (p<0.05) in the occurrence of reproductive problems. The degree of association of risk factors was assessed and parity found to be directly associated (r = 0.66) and the association was significant (p<0.05). However, body condition scores were negatively associated and had significant differences (p<0.05) on the occurrence of reproductive problems. This particular study indicated clinical reproductive problems which included metritis, abortion RFM, dystocia and repeat breeding were one of the major reproductive problems responsible for the low reproductive performance of smallholder dairy cows in and around Bedelle town, South West Ethiopia.

How to cite this article:

Molalegne Bitew and Shiv Prasad, 2011. Study on Major Reproductive Health Problems in Indigenous and Cross Breed Cows in and Around Bedelle, South West Ethiopia. Journal of Animal and Veterinary Advances, 10: 723-727.

Design and power by Medwell Web Development Team. © Medwell Publishing 2022 All Rights Reserved