The Social Sciences

Year: 2009
Volume: 4
Issue: 1
Page No. 42 - 48

Perceived Effects of Faming-Related Health Problems of Farmers’ Productivity in Yewa North Area of Ogun State, Nigeria

Authors : A.S. Onasanya

Abstract: This study investigated the perceived effects of farming related health problems on farmers’ productivity in selected villages in Yewa North Local Government area of Ogun State, Nigeria. The study covered fourteen villages, from which a total of 152 farmers were randomly selected and interviewed using a structured interview schedule. The study revealed that the common farming related health problems among the farmers include: Body itching, general body pain, matchet cut and malaria (Iba). The farmers resorted into past experiences (self medication) and visiting health centers in order to solve their health problems. The study revealed that the farmers perceived that the effects of farming related health problems was high ( = 3.90) on their productivity in the study area. Specifically, they perceived that body itching suffered during farming activities results in low farm turn out and ultimately on low productivity and that adequate rest should be observed after farming activities, so that it will improve their promptness to work the following day, thereby leaving no space for lapses on their farm work, hence leading to improve productivity. Also, the study showed that most of the farmers agreed that cold fever can result to farmers’ death thereby paralyzing their productivity, while improper handling of some chemicals can result to skin rashes which in return reduces time available for farm activities and ultimately lowers farmers’ productivity. They also perceived that ineffectiveness, inefficiency and reduced productivity could be as a result of fire burns, inhalation of pollens, insect stings and deep cuts from sharp objects. The study concluded that there were no significant relationships between the effects of farming related health problems and selected personal characteristics of the farmers. Specifically, no relationship exists between perceived effects of farming related health problems and age (χ2 calculated = 0.811, p>0.05); marital status (χ2 calculated = 0.532, p>0.05), household size (χ2 calculated = 0.903, p>0.05) and educational level (χ2 calculated = 0.519, p>0.05) of the farmers. This is an implication that the effect farming related health problems are not influenced by he selected personal characteristics of farmers. The study therefore, recommended that farmers should be properly educated on personal health care and the type of farming systems that will not endangered their health by extension agents. Also, government should encourage the farmers by providing farming implements that can be hired by farmers to reduce drudgery on their farms at reasonable costs, hence enhancing their productivity without jeopardizing their health.

How to cite this article:

A.S. Onasanya , 2009. Perceived Effects of Faming-Related Health Problems of Farmers’ Productivity in Yewa North Area of Ogun State, Nigeria. The Social Sciences, 4: 42-48.

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